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Rees NDT Inspection Services Ltd.
Your Premier Engineering Certification and Inspection Service Partner

 

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You own it, you use it--but you have no documentation--and that's a problem.

It happens more often than you think.  Lost documents, obliterated manufacturer's marks, bought at auction, fabricated by Joe's Welding the way he's done a hundred of them, got it when we bought out XYZ Corp--all sorts of reasons.  But you have been using it, safely, sometimes for years.  Then the day comes when some questions come up:

  • How do we repair it?
  • How do we maintain it?
  • What is its maximum safe working load?
  • What jobs is it useful for?
  • What jobs should it NEVER be used for?

These are questions that an employer is legally responsible for answering under Alberta OH&S Code Part 3 Section 12 & 13 or similar legislation:

Following specifications

12     An employer must ensure that
(a) equipment is of sufficient size, strength, design and made of suitable materials to withstand stresses imposed on it during its operation and to perform the function for which it is intended or was designed,
(b) the rated capacity or other limitations on the operation of the equipment, or any part of it, or supplies as described in the manufacturer’s specifications or specifications certified by a professional engineer, are not exceeded,
(c) modifications to equipment that may affect its structural integrity or stability are performed in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications or specifications certified by a professional engineer, and
(d) equipment and supplies are erected, installed, assembled, started, operated, handled, stored, serviced, tested, adjusted, calibrated, maintained, repaired and dismantled in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications or the specifications certified by a professional engineer.

Manufacturer’s and professional engineer’s specifications

13(1)     If this Code requires anything to be done in accordance with a manufacturer’s specifications, an employer may, instead of complying strictly with the manufacturer’s specifications, comply with modified specifications certified by a professional engineer.
(2)     If this Code requires anything to be done in accordance with manufacturer’s specifications and they are not available or do not exist, an employer must
    (a) develop and comply with procedures that are certified by a professional engineer as designed to ensure the thing is done in a safe manner, or
    (b) have the equipment certified as safe to operate by a professional engineer at least every 12 calendar months.

When there is no original manufacturer you can turn to to answer these questions and fulfill these legal obligations, we can help.  Our engineering team can document your 'mystery' equipment, validate its design, work out safe working capacities, and supply operating and maintenance instructions and certify the equipment as safe to operate.

When you don't have the answers you need to use your equipment safely and legally--we can provide them!